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Tom Stuckey
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Tom Stuckey was President of the British Methodist Conference in 2005. This website has been set up with his wife Christine Stuckey, who is the MWiB Southampton District President, to encourage theological reflection and dialogue both within the Methodist Church and beyond. You can participate in this.

  

Tom Stuckey

CLICK PICTURE FOR TOM'S PROFILE

 EARLY MAY EDITION

You will immediately see that this page has being reorganised. Take a look below at the new monthly reflection for Pentecost.

Christine has written her latest BLOG. As you will see it has been a busy couple of weeks as Southampton District MWiB President.

Look again at my follow-up to Colin Morris's article in the April edition of the Methodist Recorder. Am I on heretical ground? Click my response. THE BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS?
 
If you have missed it why not read my Gillingham lecture on: KILLING IN THE NAME OF GOD!'


How about emailing your comments!   mail1@tomstuckey.me.uk


 

  

  
 
       

    HERE ARE SOME OF CHRISTINE'S PAPERS
                            (click below)             
                                                                     
   
   1.  Pilgrimage to Lindisfarne

   2.  MWiB District Celebration

   3.  A Pilgrimage at home      

   
 

        THIS MONTH'S REFLECTION   by Tom

 Power and Pentecost

Jesus full of the Spirit, gave the Church a prophetic vision  and handed it on to us with a potent promise. ‘You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth’ (Acts 1.8).  

We Methodists must look again to the power of the Holy Spirit. Herein lies the secret of a renewed conviction and confidence in God. The apostle Paul proclaimed, ‘I am not ashamed of the gospel; it is the power of God for salvation…’

At your Circuit Leadership Team when did you last ask ‘What stands in the way of our rediscovery of the renewing power and presence of the Holy Spirit?’ 

Jesus calls us to be witnesses. The 2005 Conference Report ‘Time to Talk of God’ explained that we Methodists are good at talking and socializing. We also have an excellent record in community involvement. We are not howeveer very good at speaking to others about our faith.  

Pentecost was a miracle of communication when each person heard, in their own language, the apostles speaking about ‘God’s deeds of power’ (Acts 2.11). Barbara and Tom Butler in their book Just Mission quote the saying that ‘English Christians are like Canadian rivers in winter –frozen at the mouth’. Christians in those parts of the world where the Church is growing are not inhibited. Why this reticence of ours? English reserve?  Lack of confidence? Maybe we do not think it is our job. I suggest we are silent because we do not know what to say or how to say it. It is a legacy of downgrading theology. ‘Theology’ is the technical word used to describe conversations with God and about God. It is a core activity of Church.

In your Leaders of Worship and Preachers Meeting, I invite you to ask: ‘When did you last have a conversation about God with a person outside the Church and how did it go?’  

Our Lord’s promise reminds us that witness, beginning in the local Church, must move out into the community and beyond unto the ends of the earth. That’s the big picture.

Over the years nearly all our efforts have been devoted to bringing people in and getting them to accept our existing liturgical and organisational baggage so beloved of life-long Methodists. For most outsiders in their young or middle years, coming to Church is like visiting another planet.

At your Circuit Meeting can you ask: ‘Where is God calling us to plant a ‘fresh expression of Church beyond our building?’

 Commentators tell us that in writing up the Acts 2 account, Luke had in mind the Old Testament story of the tower of Babel (Genesis 11). We live in the aftermath of Babel. Ours is a fragmented world where everyone speaks but no one hears so that we lose all sense of the ‘common good’. But Babel is not the end. The future lies with Christ’s promise of Pentecost.

First published in the Methodist Recorder May 2006

 

 
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